Posts tagged Guatemala
Cruz de Maiz con Pecado
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Red Radish, corn and Tomato Tapa Salad with red chili pepper, peppermint and fried shredded pork skin (chicharrones)

Ingredients:
a. 3 cherry tomatoes sliced (different colours) and seeded.
b. 1/4 white onion diced
c. 3 red radish sliced
d. 1 red chili pepper  and seeded if you want a more mild taste
f. 1 tsp cup peppermint minced
g. 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
h. some shredded fried pork skins.

How to prepare:
Place all ingredients into a large bowl.
Mix and season with salt, to taste.
Add the chicharrones right before serving.

Garnish with some edible flowers.

 
 
 
 
Assa Nigua! Real Men are made of Corn

Exploring | Chichicastenango, Guatemala

 

Guatemalan syncretism: The Santo Tomas (Saint Thomas) catholic church -one of the main attractions, was built atop of the platform of one of the Maya temples in the area, and the 18 steps -one for each month of the Maya calendar, are still venerated.

Guatemalan syncretism: The Santo Tomas (Saint Thomas) catholic church -one of the main attractions, was built atop of the platform of one of the Maya temples in the area, and the 18 steps -one for each month of the Maya calendar, are still venerated.

 

Lovingly called Chichi, the small village of Chichicastenango has been one of the largest trading centers in the mayan world since pre-hispanic times. There is lots to see, smell and taste. 500 years ago, one of the best kept secrets of the mayan civilization was hidden from the spanish conquerors in this tiny town. A mysterious book.

 

“Their flesh was made of white and yellow corn. The arms and legs of men were made of corn meal." So goes the story of creation of men from the Maya sacred book the “Popol Vuh”, the so called Mayan bible. Most of the Mayan codices were burnt by the Spanish conquerors, who feared the influence of the devil, but in 1558, a Mayan transcribed the Popol Vuh into the Quiche language.

The manuscript was treasured by the Mayans of Chichicastenango  village and it was hidden from the Spanish conquerors. Two centuries later, a Spanish priest named Francisco Ximénez gained the trust of the Mayan community. They allowed him to see the book and he translated it into Spanish.

The Popol Vuh deals with the Mayan creation myth. After many attempts with clay and wood, the Mayan gods finally made four men out of corn and they became “true people”.

 

The Popol Vuh deals with the Mayan creation myth. After many attempts with clay and wood, the Mayan gods finally made four men out of corn and they became “true people”.

Which makes a kind of metaphorical sense: it was the cultivation of corn that gave the early Maya culture the means to change from hunter- gatherers to their advanced civilization... 

 
 
Chicicastenango: The market place.

Chicicastenango: The market place.

 
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"Chichicastenango is still a mystical place where Guatemalans from all around the country come to trade and sell their goods every Thursday and Sunday in a big outdoor market that -in essence- has not changed very much in the last 500 years."

 
Flower vendors. Chichicastenango

Flower vendors. Chichicastenango

 

"There is lots to see, smell and taste. Food vendors sell local dishes with pre-Hispanic origins"

 
Pulique, a prehispanic chicken dish with "recado" (a Guatemalan word for a complex sauce)

Pulique, a prehispanic chicken dish with "recado" (a Guatemalan word for a complex sauce)

 
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Signs of catholicic and mayan syncretism

Signs of catholicic and mayan syncretism

Notes for the recipe

Notes for the recipe

 
The church of Santo Tomás in front of the Chichicastenango market, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh.

The church of Santo Tomás in front of the Chichicastenango market, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh.

 

Situated not too far away from Lake Atitlan, the village of Chichicastenango is still a mystical place where Guatemalans from all around the country come to trade and sell their goods every Thursday and Sunday in a big outdoor market that -in essence- has not changed very much in the last 500 years. There is lots to see, smell and taste. Food vendors sell local dishes with pre-Hispanic origins, such as Pulique, a chicken dish with recado (recado is the Guatemalan word for a complex sauce with a thick texture which is the result of adding corn flour at the end of the cooking process).It is served with -yes- corn tortillas. However, the unique flavour of this recado is provided by the Apazote plant. People believe that Apazote is great to help remove negative forces from the body. For positive forces you should drink Atol Blanco. Atol Blanco is a traditional corn-starch-based thick hot drink. So if you want to prove that you are a mero mero- a really true Guatemalan - and want hear them say "Assa Nigua!" - a Guatemalan expression of admiration- you have to drink lots of Atol. Don´t be surprised if at the end you really believe that you are made of corn.

 

So if you want to prove that you are a mero mero - a really true Guatemalan - and want hear them say "Assa Nigua!" - a Guatemalan expression of admiration- you have to drink lots of Atol. Don´t be surprised if at the end you really believe that you are made of corn.

But one of my favourite recipes from “Chichi” that I often prepare at home is totally corn free: a tasty radish salad with Chicharrones (fried pork rinds) called Cojin Chichicastengo* that I first tasted at a food stall in front of the church of Santo Tomás, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh. 

(*) 
Without Chicharrones (fried pork rinds) the salad is known as Picado de Rabanos and it is a delicious side dish (very close to the mexican Pico de Gallo Salad) that goes well with any kind of grilled meat, adding Chicharrones turns into Cojin Chichicastengo.

 

© Text, Artwork and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist

 
 
Chicken Bus Recipe

That Recipe on my Mind | Guatemala

 

Guatemalan Chicken with Pineapple Recipe

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil or 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 -3 1⁄2 lbs broiler-fryer chickens, in pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 pineapple, cut in 1 inch cubes or 1 (20 ounce) can unsweetened pineapple chunks, drained
1⁄2 cup dry sherry
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1⁄4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 dash pepper
2 medium tomatoes, coarsely chopped
hot cooked rice (can cook concurrently so all is ready at the same time)

 

How to prepare:

Heat oil in lg skillet; cook chicken on med heat until brown on all sides-- approx 15 min.
Remove chicken, cook onion& garlic in remaining oil until onion is tender, stirring frequently.
Return chicken to skillet.
Mix all remaining ingredients except tomatoes (and rice!); pour over chicken.
Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer 20 min.
Add tomatoes; simmer, uncovered, until thickest pieces of chicken are cooked through-- approx 20 min.
Serve with rice.

 
 
 
Guatemala's Food Markets

+++Sketching

 
 
 
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Notes from Tikal

Exploring | El Peten, Guatemala

 
 
 
 
 
Tamales

Tamales

 
 
Kak Ik, an ancient Mayan dish, originally from the Cobán region.

Kak Ik, an ancient Mayan dish, originally from the Cobán region.

 
 
Chirimoya (or Cherimoya) and Plantains

Chirimoya (or Cherimoya) and Plantains

© Text and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist