Posts tagged Europe
Magen verbindet

That Recipe on my Mind | Inspired, Austria

 
 
 

Styrian Tripe Soup with Turkish Sumac Delight

(Altsteirische Flecksuppe mit Turkish-Sumac-Delights)

 

Tripe soup 

Ingredients:
500 g Tripe, washed  - chopped fine  
1 Onion- chopped fine   
1 Garlic clove - chopped fine             
 2 bayleafs
1/2 tsp black pepper    
1 liter  Water                                    
1 tsp  Paprika powder       
Salt                                       
1 t  Vegetable oil       
1 tsp Lard                                       
1 tsp Flour                                            
some grated nutmeg
0,5 - 1cm crunchy bread croutons   

 


How to prepare:
Put chopped tripe into pan. Add water, bayleafs, black pepper and salt to taste and simmer slowly 1-2 hours until meat is tender. Strain the stock.
In a pan, add diced onion, garlic and lard, cook to golden brown. Add flour (in Austria this procedure is called „Einbrenn“). Heat paprika powder and add to the mix. Dilute with some water, mix well and add it to the strained stock. 
Add some grated nutmeg. Mix well again with an egg beater (or with an styrian egg beater if you want to keep it traditional) till foamy.       
Serve the soup, add a dollop of sour cream, place on top some smashed bread croutons and the turkish sumac delights cubes (see recipe bellow).

 

Turkish Sumac Delight

(like common Turkish delights, just with sumac water instead of Rose water and  -optionally - fine salt instead of sugar powder)


Ingredients:
Few drops of Sumac Juice/water* or diluted sumac syrup.
8 leaves gelatine
500g granulated sugar
Few drops of pink liquid food colouring
2 tbsp fine salt
1 tbsp cornflour
18cm square sandwich tin

How to prepare:
Pour 300ml water into a pan and add the gelatine leaves, breaking them in half, if necessary, so that they fit. Leave the gelatine to bloom for about 5 mins, then place the pan on a low heat and stir gently until the gelatine melts. Add the sugar and stir until it has dissolved. Increase the heat and bring the mixture to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer it gently for 20 mins.
Remove the pan from the heat and stir in Sumac water and food colouring, until it's pale pink. Wet the sandwich tin with cold water, then pour in the sumac water. Leave this in a cool place to set overnight.
Sift the salt and cornflour together onto a plate or board. Use a long knife with a damp blade to cut the jelly into 0.5 or 1cm squares. Coat all cut surfaces in the powder mixture (salt and cornflour).


(*)
Sumac Juice

Ingredients:
1 ripe sumac berries
Cold water

How to prepare:
Immerse at least six-eight ripe smooth or staghorn sumac berry clusters in a pitcher-full of cool water. (Do not short-cut with hot water, as it makes the drink bitter).
Mash with wooden pestle or potato masher.
Let liquid stand for at least four hours.
Strain through cloth or a fine mesh strainer.

 
 
 

About eatnologist

Hi, I´m Fred, a mix of austrian and spanish. At Eatnologist I explore, sketch and also relive culinary experiences by travelling back inside my mind and putting them down on canvas.

I love old cook books, usually they have no pictures of the dishes, so I love to imagine them.

What happens when you close your eyes and think about a certain kind of dish or recipe? What kind of images, emotions, memories, stereotypes, reflections and associated thoughts come to mind? 

Besides being a set of instructions describing how to put together a culinary creation, a recipe can mirror many aspects of culture, identity and how a whole society or single person relates to its environment. 

 

Read more about Eatnologist and That Recipe on my Mind here  >

 
 

"Quirl"

 
 
Gazpacho Passion

That Recipe on my Mind | Andalusia, Spain

 

Andalusian Gazpacho Recipe

Ingredients:

a. 500g ripe juicy tomatoes
b. 1 garlic clove
c. 1 sweet green pepper
d. 1 cucumber, about 6-7 inches long
e. 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
f. 1⁄2 tablespoon salt
g. 1 cup virgin olive oil
h. 1 piece French bread
 

How to prepare:

1.Put the tomatoes, bell pepper, cucumber, onion, olive oil, bread, vinegar, and garlic in a blender; season with salt and pepper. Process until smooth, adding up to ½ cup water if necessary. 

2. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Refrigerate for up to a few hours before serving or serve immediately.

 
 
 
 
Gaudi, Food and Religion

Exploring | Barcelona, Spain

 
 
 

Barcelona | Spain

A conversation with Etsuro Sotoo, sculptor-in-chief of the Sagrada Familia about the links between him, Antoni Gaudi, architecture, religion and food.

I met the Japanese sculptor Etsuro Sotoo at his studio not far away from Gaudi’s crypt, in the non- public space of the Sagrada Familia, surrounded by an infinity of sketches, drawings, plans and miniature models. Sotoo has made it his life's work to carry on the master's project since 1978, when he began as a stone mason. Later on, as sculptor-in-chief of the Sagrada Familia, he was commissioned to follow Gaudi's unmistakable style –”but there were times where I did not know how to follow him“, confesses Sotoo to me on a short walk through the construction site.

In fact, Gaudi did not leave detailed plans for the many high reliefs that decorate the fantastical façades when he died, so designing new sculptures can be sometimes “a monumental headache”, as Sotoo says. He himself has often felt hopeless and confused and not known how to follow Gaudi ´s mostly non-existent guidelines for the design of the church. One day, while standing in front of Gaudi´s tomb, Sotoo heard a voice. ”The voice said to me: ‘Don’t look at what I have done, look at that what I would want to look at.’ He showed me a path that I could follow. Since them I speak to Gaudi every day. Now I have the formula to interpret and continue Gaudi’s work. “

 

 
 

Gaudi did not leave detailed plans for the many high reliefs that decorate the fantastical façades when he died, so designing new sculptures can be sometimes “a monumental headache”, as Sotoo says.

 
 
 
The Sculptor Etsuro Sotoo in his Studio with Gaudi's death mask: "One day, as I was in front of Gaudi´s thomb, I heard a voice. „The voice said to me: Dont´ look at what I have done, look at that what I would look at. Since them I speak everyday to Gaudi. He gave a path that I could follow. Now I have the formula to interpret  and continue Gaudis work."

The Sculptor Etsuro Sotoo in his Studio with Gaudi's death mask: "One day, as I was in front of Gaudi´s thomb, I heard a voice. „The voice said to me: Dont´ look at what I have done, look at that what I would look at. Since them I speak everyday to Gaudi. He gave a path that I could follow. Now I have the formula to interpret  and continue Gaudis work."

 
 

Etsuro Sotoo has since converted to Catholicism and he is known to many people as the Asian reincarnation of Antoni Gaudi. However, the Japanese national, who is Spanish by choice, is not only devoted to the religion but also to Spanish cuisine. His love for Iberian cured ham lead him to work together with Joselito, one of the best –if not the best –Spanish cured ham manufacturers: he has been in charge of designing a luxurious chest for the company with the ancestral Japanese technique of urushi.  The otherwise silent and reserved Sotoo glows when it comes to food: “One thing I really love about Barcelona is that you get very good quality fish at reasonable prices (compared to Japan)! And tuna sashimi. I love those superb tuna blocks in the Boqueria market. “Stone blocks, tuna blocks, stone cutting, Iberico ham cutting..., hmm, I assume there are some parallels between his work as a sculptor and his preferences as a foodie.

 

And what about Gaudi and his preferences for food? Is there also a connection between his work and food?

 
 
 
 
After the meeting with Etsuro Sotoo I went to Cal Pep for a Tuna Tartare.

After the meeting with Etsuro Sotoo I went to Cal Pep for a Tuna Tartare.

And what about Gaudi and his preferences for food? Is there also a connection between his work and food? Who else if not Sotoo could give me an answer:  “Gaudi lived as an ascetic and refused the joy of food. There are some stories about that. Food was apparently not important for him”- says Sotoo, continuing:-  “But I have been thinking about your question since the day  you contacted me, and yes, maybe there are some links between food, the Sagrada Familia and Gaudi. Can you see those semi-finished sculptures of fruits and cereals over there? You will see many of them all around the Sagrada Familia. Here, at the lower part of the Church you will find sculptures of buds and sprouts, but in the upper part you will see sculptures of all those sprouts blossoming and the very top fruits and cereals, the result of the harvest.  What do you think Gaudi wanted to say to us with that? “, asked me Sotoo. “I don’t know” I replied. “For me –continued Sotoo– the symbolism is now clear. To grow physically you need food, to grow spiritually you need religion.”

 

© Text and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist

 
 
 
A Fisherman in the Woods

Garrykennedy | Ireland

+++That Recipe on my Mind

 

 

 

 

Irish roasted Salmon with Irish Whiskey Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons honey
1⁄4 cup cider vinegar
1⁄4 cup Irish whiskey
1⁄2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
salt & freshly ground black pepper
4 salmon fillets

How to prepare:

Mix together honey, vinegar, whiskey, lemon zest, oil, salt and pepper. Pour over salmon and marinate 1 hour on the counter, or 4 hours refrigerated.
Preheat oven to 200°C 450°F.
Remove salmon from marinade and place on a rack over a roasting pan.
Grill or Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, basting once with the marinade or until golden and white juices are just beginning to appear.

 
 
Notes from Napoli

Exploring | Naples, Italy

 

 - Fieldnotes -

 
@eatnologist_napoli_food_sketch_sketchbook_italy.jpg
 
Burrata cheese served with rocket pesto, chopped sundried tomatoes and Sfusato Amalfitano Zest

Burrata cheese served with rocket pesto, chopped sundried tomatoes and Sfusato Amalfitano Zest