Oh! she has Spines

That Recipe on my Mind | Inspired, Croatia

eatnologist_©_recipe_sea_urchin_lemon_foam_comp.jpg
 

Raw Sea Urchins with Lemon Foam/Air Recipe

 

Makes 2 servings

 

Ingredients
a. 6 Sea urchins in shells
b. 1 cup Lemon juice
c. 1 cup Water
d. 3g Soy Lecithin

How to prepare:

Sea Urchins:
Sea urchins spines are venomous, so prompt and proper care is important.
Wear gloves while you trim off the spines to protect your hands from accidental stings.
1. Insert scissors in hole located on domed top of sea urchin.
2. Rotate around top of shell, cutting toward outer edge, exposing flesh.
3. Arrange sea urchins on plates

Lemon Foam / Air:  
1. Mix all 3 ingredients in a high container. 
2 Hold blender in the upper part of the liquid to bring the largest amount of air, so that a foam forms on the surface.
3. Collect the upper part with a large spoon. Arrange on sea urchins.

gallery
eatnologist
Imprint

Impressum.

Bildschirmfoto 2019-01-15 um 14.30.48.png
 

Contact

hello@eatnologist.com

1040 Wien

Adresse aus datenschutzrechtlichen Gründen nur auf Anfrage



Datenschutz

Erklärung zur Informationspflicht

Der Schutz Ihrer persönlichen Daten ist uns ein besonderes Anliegen. Wir verarbeiten Ihre Daten daher ausschließlich auf Grundlage der gesetzlichen Bestimmungen (DSGVO, TKG 2003). In diesen Datenschutzinformationen informieren wir Sie über die wichtigsten Aspekte der Datenverarbeitung im Rahmen unserer Website.

Kontakt mit mir

Wenn Sie per Formular auf der Website oder per E-Mail Kontakt mit uns aufnehmen, werden Ihre angegebenen Daten zwecks Bearbeitung der Anfrage und für den Fall von Anschlussfragen sechs Monate bei uns gespeichert. Diese Daten geben wir nicht ohne Ihre Einwilligung weiter.

Cookies

Unsere Website verwendet so genannte Cookies. Dabei handelt es sich um kleine Textdateien, die mit Hilfe des Browsers auf Ihrem Endgerät abgelegt werden. Sie richten keinen Schaden an.

Wir nutzen Cookies dazu, unser Angebot nutzerfreundlich zu gestalten. Einige Cookies bleiben auf Ihrem Endgerät gespeichert, bis Sie diese löschen. Sie ermöglichen es uns, Ihren Browser beim nächsten Besuch wiederzuerkennen.

Wenn Sie dies nicht wünschen, so können Sie Ihren Browser so einrichten, dass er Sie über das Setzen von Cookies informiert und Sie dies nur im Einzelfall erlauben.

Bei der Deaktivierung von Cookies kann die Funktionalität unserer Website eingeschränkt sein.

Web-Analyse

Unsere Website verwendet Funktionen des Webanalysedienstes … [Name des Tools und Firma des Anbieters samt Unternehmenssitz einschließlich Information, ob Daten an ein (außereuropäisches) Drittland übertragen werden]. Dazu werden Cookies verwendet, die eine Analyse der Benutzung der Website durch Ihre Benutzer ermöglicht. Die dadurch erzeugten Informationen werden auf den Server des Anbieters übertragen und dort gespeichert.

Sie können dies verhindern, indem Sie Ihren Browser so einrichten, dass keine Cookies gespeichert werden.

Wir haben mit dem Anbieter einen entsprechenden Vertrag zur Auftragsdatenverarbeitung abgeschlossen.

{Nutzung von IP-Adressen auf Basis der Rechtsgrundlage „berechtigtes Interesse“; in diesem Fall wird eine Pseudonymisierung empfohlen:} Ihre IP-Adresse wird erfasst, aber umgehend (z.B. durch Löschung der letzten 8 Bit)pseudonymisiert. Dadurch ist nur mehr eine grobe Lokalisierung möglich.

{Bei außereuropäischen Anbietern:} Die Beziehung zum Webanalyseanbieter basiert auf … [Standardvertragsklauseln/einem Angemessenheitsbeschluss der Europäischen Komission (z.B. im Fall der USA: „Privacy Shield“)].

Die Datenverarbeitung erfolgt auf Basis der gesetzlichen Bestimmungen des § 96 Abs 3 TKG sowie des Art 6 Abs 1 lit a (Einwilligung) und/oder f (berechtigtes Interesse) der DSGVO.

Unser Anliegen im Sinne der DSGVO (berechtigtes Interesse) ist die Verbesserung unseres Angebotes und unseres Webauftritts. Da uns die Privatsphäre unserer Nutzer wichtig ist, werden die Nutzerdaten pseudonymisiert [Pseudonymisierung wird beim Rechtsgrund „berechtigtes Interesse“ empfohlen; dies muss mit dem Webanalysedienst abgeklärt werden].

Die Nutzerdaten werden für die Dauer von … [Speicherfrist angeben] aufbewahrt [dies muss mit dem Webanalysedienst abgeklärt werden].

Ihre Rechte

Ihnen stehen bezüglich Ihrer bei uns gespeicherten Daten grundsätzlich die Rechte auf Auskunft, Berichtigung, Löschung, Einschränkung, Datenübertragbarkeit, Widerruf und Widerspruch zu. Wenn Sie glauben, dass die Verarbeitung Ihrer Daten gegen das Datenschutzrecht verstößt oder Ihre datenschutzrechtlichen Ansprüche sonst in einer Weise verletzt worden sind, können Sie sich bei der uns [E-Mail-Adresse abgeben] oder der Datenschutzbehörde beschweren.

Sie erreichen mich unter folgenden Kontaktdaten:

hello@eatnologist.com

eatnologistimprint
Maldivian Island Hopping

That Recipe on my Mind | Maldives

eatnologist_maldives_islan_hopping.png
 

Fihunu Mas (Maldivian grilled fish spice mix) on shredded coconut, herbs and algae.

Ingredients:

3 fish fillets with skin on: tuna, red snapper and sea bass gutted and descaled

1 red dried chilli, finely chopped

1/2 chopped onion2 cloves garlic

1 teaspoon cumin powder

2 curry leaves

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

Salt to season.

Plating:

3 teaspoons shredded coconut

1 teaspoon algae (nori seaweed stripes)

1 teaspoon coriander

How to prepare:

Blend the spice mixture to a smooth thick paste. Make deep slashes along the sides of the descaled fish, and pack with the spice paste. Grill over hot coal (or a grill pan), on both sides until done.

Place the grilled fish on the shredded coconut and garnish with herbs and algae

 
 
 
 
 
A Mini Road Trip Movie with Topsi Venter

Exploring | Cape Winelands, South Africa 

 
 
 
 

Topsi Venter was the Grand Dame of South African cuisine. Topsi, whose real name was Pauline Venter, was a living legend among her chef colleagues. No matter who you asked, all roads in South African cuisine seem to lead to her.

 

I wasn't even aware of her when I met her for the first time in her restaurant. I had just visited Margot Janse in the award-winning Tasting Room in the Quartier Francais when she said that I just had to go to see Topsi since she only lived a few houses further down on the same street. Sometimes when you go through a door you have no idea that something important is about to happen. Awaiting me that afternoon was a high-speed journey into the past, the present and the future of South African cuisine.

A few days before, I found out that Topsi was an old woman who, due to an operation, could barely walk and talk... yet it turned out that this was only partly the truth. When I entered the house, Topsi was stood right in front of me on her crutches. Margot Janse had apparently just been on the phone to her and so she knew that I was on my way. "So, young man", she said "you’re interested in South African cuisine? Where are you from?" "Actually," I answered, "I’m half from Spain, half from Austria, and..." "Spain...?" She didn't let me finish my sentence " a famous Spanish chef spent a few weeks in South Africa. How was he called?... Oh yes, Ferran Adria, and I cooked something for him – he was quite nice and just as curious as any child. But follow me, let me show you something." She went limping into the kitchen. "Oh, my knee hurts! she said," I’ve just had an operation"

"...a famous Spanish chef spent a few weeks in South Africa. How was he called?... Oh yes, Ferran Adria, and I cooked something for him – he was quite nice and just as curious as any child...

We went briefly into the kitchen, greeted her daughter Danielle, who was just cooking a Bootie -a South African national dish with Malaysian origins - and then we went right on through into the next room. It was a library. The room was filled with shelves stacked high with cookbooks, cookbooks and even more cookbooks. As if she could read my mind, she knew that this was something quite extraordinary for me.  "This is my treasure trove!", said the trained architect and art historian, which is where her love for eating turned into a love for cooking.

She showed me the books, many of which were beautifully illustrated. I was fascinated and intrigued. She took yet another one from the shelf read it to me.  "This is by C. Louis Leipoldt, a South African poet... listen to this: and there is the art of cooking, which is one the greatest expressions of culture and civilisation, because it converts food from a mere necessity into a social delight and rejoicing in being alive, however cold the day and dark the night...." She took a long pause and looked at me and said: "What I thought now, is that we should go to Renata! Come on, get your things. I’ll fetch the car keys!" She limped quickly towards the desk. Somewhat shocked I thought, "Oh my, are we really taking the car? Seriously? If she can barely get around, how on earth can she drive?".

Approaching the desk with difficulty, she carefully opened a drawer and suddenly a parrot appeared, "Can I introduce you to Miss Oscar Wilde?" said Topsi "I think he's gay.

Approaching the desk with difficulty, she carefully opened a drawer and suddenly a parrot appeared, "Can I introduce you to Miss Oscar Wilde?" said Topsi "I think he's gay. Now where the hell are those car keys?" she cursed loudly.  We got in to an old, rusty brown Mercedes.  "You’ll have to keep hold of the door while we’re driving – it sometimes flies open", said Topsi. "Where are we going? And who is this Renata?" I asked.  "To the past and into the future!!!" Topsi replied. Renata Coetzee – as Topsi told me while driving at full throttle through the Winelands – was a food historian, also 80 years of age, who knew ten times as much about South African cuisine as any other person. Her area of research was the oldest cuisine in the world, the thousand-year-old cuisine of San and the Khoikhoin people. It had become her life mission. She had even documented the plants and herbs of this original cuisine - Fynbos vegetation. "Then we could drive down to see Shoeman", Topsi said. "Guys like him embody the culinary future of our country. He cooks with these completely unknown plants and herbs in the Fyndraai Restaurant. It will open up a completely new universe of tastes and smells. You'll see". "I hope so!" I think, as I regard the rickety door of the Mercedes with something approaching panic.

 
Topsi Venter in her old Mercedes Benz

Topsi Venter in her old Mercedes Benz

 

"Where are we going Topsi? And who is this Renata?" I asked.  "To the past and into the future!!!" Topsi replied. Renata Coetzee – as Topsi told me while driving at full throttle through the Winelands – was a food historian, also 80 years of age, who knew ten times as much about South African cuisine as any other person.

 
 
 
 
A present from the dessert for me: Kalahari Truffle (peeled), "the potato of the Koihsan".

A present from the dessert for me: Kalahari Truffle (peeled), "the potato of the Koihsan".

"...Guys like Shoeman embody the culinary future of our country. He cooks with these completely unknown plants and herbs..." 

Topsi Venter

Indigenous herbs: Koekemakranka, or Kroekemakrank or also known as Gethyllis was a plant used in one of the most ancient kitchens of the world: the one of the Khoisan people, who live in the south-west coastal strips of Africa (actual Southafrica and Namibia). The may once have comprised the majority of living humans on the planet, for much of the past 150,000 years. Today, The ripe fruit is sometimes used to impart its special aroma to brandy. More Illustrations  here

Indigenous herbs: Koekemakranka, or Kroekemakrank or also known as Gethyllis was a plant used in one of the most ancient kitchens of the world: the one of the Khoisan people, who live in the south-west coastal strips of Africa (actual Southafrica and Namibia). The may once have comprised the majority of living humans on the planet, for much of the past 150,000 years. Today, The ripe fruit is sometimes used to impart its special aroma to brandy. More Illustrations here

 
 
 
In memorian: Topsi Venter passed 2016 away at the age of 85. Thank you Topsi for this awesome day!

In memorian: Topsi Venter passed 2016 away at the age of 85. Thank you Topsi for this awesome day!

© Text, Artwork and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist

 
 
 
FO 066
 
Aguaje

Food Object 066  Aguaje Fruit | Tropical Central & Northern South America.

A hand grenade? Not exactly, but this fruit is truly a vitamin bomb.

"Aguaje" grows in tropical Central and South America and contains from 21 to 38 times more vitamin A than carrot, from 25 to 31 times more vitamin E than avocado, and it has the same content of vitamin C as an orange. Plus: It helps to shape the female figure and increase breast size (however, this is not backed by scientific studies).

 
 
 
 
Food inspired by Landscape

Sketching / Quick notes

 
IMG_6958_F_pesto.jpg
 
 

Rocket salad, oven baked Ricotta, dried tomatoes-walnut pesto. Inspired | Italy

 
 
_IMG_7827_vogerlsalat_halloumi_tapenade3.jpg
 
 

Halloumi Olive Tapenade & lamb's lettuce. Inspired | Greece

 
 
Bildschirmfoto 2019-01-16 um 17.31.45.png
 
 

Backed sweet potato, baby mangold, mint vinaigrette, almond. Inspired | Spain

 
The Happy Meal

Exploring | Rasdu Atoll, Maldives

©_eatnologist_maldives_food_travel_fish_recipe_seafood_paradise_maldivian_food26b.jpg
 

Paradise (definition):

- a very beautiful, pleasant, or peaceful place that seems to be perfect

- a place that is perfect for a particular activity or for a person who enjoys that activity

- a state of complete happiness

 

"...what about Maldivians who live here? Are they always happy? What do they dream about? What is their idea of paradise on earth?..." 

 

 
unnamed-3B.jpg
 
 
 
 

The water is crystal clear. I see my footprints fading in the sand. I look around. The breeze is blowing through the palm trees. The air is warm and humid and there is a delicious smell of fresh, charcoal-grilled fish. I want to try every single Maldivian seafood dish. It´s all just too perfect here. Am I dreaming? 

But what about Maldivians who live here? Are they always happy? What do they dream about? What is their idea of paradise on earth? 

 
 
Faraha and Anha

Faraha and Anha

 
 

Faraha, Anha and Ahusan.

Later on I met Faraha and Anha on a neighbouring island where locals live. The two little girls were going to see their older cousin Ahusam play soccer and they invited me to follow them.

Ahusan was wearing an old Real Madrid T-shirt. He came to greet us and I took the chance to introduce myself.

Ahusan, may I ask you something? If you imagined yourself in a paradise, what would it look like and what would you like to eat there?

- Chicken McNuggets.

Sorry?

 
 

"...Ahusan, may I ask you something? If you imagined yourself in a paradise, what would it look like and what would you like to eat there?

- Chicken McNuggets.

Sorry!?..."

 

- Chicken McNuggets, says Ahusan again.

Are you serious? Is this your idea of Paradise?

- Yes. My idea of Paradise is to eat a box of Chicken McNuggets while watching a game between Real Madrid and another team at the Bernabeu stadium in Madrid. That would be my dream.

- Yeeeeees, Chicken Mc Nuggets! - yelled the two cousins.

But why??

- We saw these Chicken McNuggets yesterday on tv!

***k globalisation.

 
 

© Text, Artwork and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist

 
 
 
 
 
blanc

Follow the creative process: last updates and videos (IG-stories) on instagram

eatnologist
The Cycle of Life Calendar 2019

That Recipe on my Mind

eatnologist
August | Maturity

That Recipe on my Mind | The Cycle of Life Calendar 19

banana_bling_bling_dish_96B-1.jpg
 

Scallop Ceviche with watermelon, peppermint mousse & mango-chili gelatin

Ingredients:

2 bananas

2 spoons sparkling wine

2 tsp lemmon juice

2 tsp sour cream

salt

pepper

4 tsp herring caviar

How to prepare:

Place banana, sparkling wine, sour cream, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a blender

Process for 15 seconds at high speed until smooth. Set aside in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to allow the flavors to blend and process once again before serving.

Pour mixture into small bowl (I used a small empty tuna can) and top with a layer of caviar.

Serve immediately

Wine recommendations by Wein und Kunst here >

 
 
Calender19eatnologist
About The Cycle of Life Food Art Calendar
blob
 

That Recipe on my Mind | The Cycle of Life:

The Cycle of Nature and 12 Stages of Human Life in 12 Months and 12 Recipes

A Food Art Calendar Concept by Eatnologist.

The method:

A food recipe can be more than a set of instructions for preparing a particular dish, including a list of the ingredients required. In addition to that, the conceptual creation of a recipe can also be the result of putting together experiences, images, textures, senses, emotions, memories, reflections, stereotypes and associated thoughts that come to mind.

As a food blogger and a visually driven person, most of my ideas come by mixing different kinds of images. Representation of seasonal ingredients and different thoughts in the form of collages and sketches are the field notes of my explorations that work as inspirational mood boards for new recipes ideas or arrangements.

The idea:

Each of the 12 illustrated calendar pages posted at the beginning of the month is the visual output of my reflections for the following theme: The parellelism between the yearly cycle of nature in 12 months and 12 different stages of human life, from conception to death. They will serve as inspiration for creating at least 12 new dishes that I will post on the 21st of every month.

The creative process:

Up to new culinary adventures and sensory exploration? I invite you to follow the creative process and weekly updates through the stories at my diary on instagram here.

And of course, I will be very glad if you become inspired either by the visuals, the resulting dishes or the creative process and you share that with me. I will be happy to share it with the audience.

The printed calendar.

This project mixes both analogue and digital worlds, and was created in partnership with abcdruck, metzgerdruck, abcpremium and abcmedien

The printed version of this calendar has already been distributed to their clients.

„Each printed calendar page highlights two printed fragrances/scents from the main ingredients to enhance the sensory experience“ says abcdruck general manager Natalie Rothermel. Along with the artwork (giving other visual clues of possible food pairings as a source of inspiration), the viewer will be invited to interact, explore the surface, travel with his mind and make his own interpretation of what he sees and smells, and to mentally create his own pairings.

Get inspired and embark on a one year sensory culinary adventure that will spark your creativity.

Fred Mel, Eatnologist

 
eatnologisttopcover
January | Conception

That Recipe on my Mind | The Cycle of Life Calendar 19

01_january_eatnologist_cycle_of_life.jpg

The Beginning of a New Year | The Beginning of a New Life

 

Pour-Over-Pear-Hazelnut and Celeriac Tapioca Pearl Soup with Egg Yolk

Ingredients for 2 persons

1 tablespoon butter

2 shallots, finely sliced

2 teaspoons finely chopped hazelnut

1 celeriac, peeled and roughly chopped

2 pears ripe, cored and roughly chopped

1/2 litre vegetable stock

1/2 cup pearl tapioca

2 egg yolks

How to prepare:

Pour the tapioca into boiling water (use 1 cup of boiling water for 1/2 cup tapioca), Stir in the tapioca pearls and cook, stirring occasionally. To check tapioca pearls for doneness, look for a tiny white dot in the center of the pearl. Drain and set aside.

Heat butter in a saucepan, add the shallots and hazelnut, and cook over a medium heat for about 5 minutes until softened but not coloured.

Add the celeriac, pears and stock, bring to the boil, then reduce to a simmer and simmer for 20-30 minutes or until the celeriac has softened enough to mash easily.

Liquidise the soup in a blender until silky smooth. Sieve to catch any bits.

Before serving add the pearl tapioca to the soup, season to taste and boil it again.

Plating: place the egg yolk in a soup plate and pour the hot soup. The egg yolk will get partially poached with the soup.

 

Learn more about the Cycle of Life Calendar Concept here or follow the creative process and weekly updates through the stories at my diary on instagram here.

Autumn Passion

That Recipe on my Mind

eatnologist_autumn_passion_.jpg
 

Quick note / no recipe: Crème brûlée with passion fruit mousse. Passion fruit season in Vietnam starts in october and France is the main market. There are so many cultural and culinary links between those two countries... so why not mix this two concepts on a dish? Crème brûlée - the french classic with vanilla bean and caramelized sugar - and the citric notes of the passion fruit (and a bit of lime) bring the colors of autumn and a little bit of sun now that days are getting darker and colder.

 
Tom Yum Ice Tea Cocktail with grilled Prawn

That Recipe on my Mind  | Inspired, Thailand

eatnologist_Tom_Yam_ice_teal_cocktail_grilled_schrimp_spread_1.jpg
 
 

Tom Yum Ice Tea Cocktail with grilled Prawn Recipe

Ingredients:
a. 30 ml lime juice
b. 1 cup finely chopped lemon grass
c. 1 tsps palm sugar
d. 2 Kaffir lime leaves
e. 4 galangal slices
f. 1 red chili, sliced
g. 2 to 3 ice-cubes, to serve
h. 1 prawn (grilled)

How to prepare:
Combine the lemon grass, 2 slices of galangal and sugar with 2 cups of water in a pan and bring it to a boil.
Remove from the fire, allow to cool overnight (or 8 hours). Strain through a muslin cloth to get an infusion.

In the serving glass, put kaffir lime leaves, galangal and chili and 2 to 3 ice-cubes and pour ¼ cup of the cold infusion.
Top with the lime juice, stir gently, and garnish with a grilled prawn (skewer the shrimp with satay or wood sticks and place on top.)

Serve immediately.

 
 
Assa Nigua! Real Men are made of Corn

Exploring | Chichicastenango, Guatemala

 

Guatemalan syncretism: The Santo Tomas (Saint Thomas) catholic church -one of the main attractions, was built atop of the platform of one of the Maya temples in the area, and the 18 steps -one for each month of the Maya calendar, are still venerated.

Guatemalan syncretism: The Santo Tomas (Saint Thomas) catholic church -one of the main attractions, was built atop of the platform of one of the Maya temples in the area, and the 18 steps -one for each month of the Maya calendar, are still venerated.

 

Lovingly called Chichi, the small village of Chichicastenango has been one of the largest trading centers in the mayan world since pre-hispanic times. There is lots to see, smell and taste. 500 years ago, one of the best kept secrets of the mayan civilization was hidden from the spanish conquerors in this tiny town. A mysterious book.

 

“Their flesh was made of white and yellow corn. The arms and legs of men were made of corn meal." So goes the story of creation of men from the Maya sacred book the “Popol Vuh”, the so called Mayan bible. Most of the Mayan codices were burnt by the Spanish conquerors, who feared the influence of the devil, but in 1558, a Mayan transcribed the Popol Vuh into the Quiche language.

The manuscript was treasured by the Mayans of Chichicastenango  village and it was hidden from the Spanish conquerors. Two centuries later, a Spanish priest named Francisco Ximénez gained the trust of the Mayan community. They allowed him to see the book and he translated it into Spanish.

The Popol Vuh deals with the Mayan creation myth. After many attempts with clay and wood, the Mayan gods finally made four men out of corn and they became “true people”.

 

The Popol Vuh deals with the Mayan creation myth. After many attempts with clay and wood, the Mayan gods finally made four men out of corn and they became “true people”.

Which makes a kind of metaphorical sense: it was the cultivation of corn that gave the early Maya culture the means to change from hunter- gatherers to their advanced civilization... 

 
 
Chicicastenango: The market place.

Chicicastenango: The market place.

 
1478349628635.jpeg
©_eatnologist_guatemala_america_food_sketchbook_food_travelsketch.jpg

"Chichicastenango is still a mystical place where Guatemalans from all around the country come to trade and sell their goods every Thursday and Sunday in a big outdoor market that -in essence- has not changed very much in the last 500 years."

 
Flower vendors. Chichicastenango

Flower vendors. Chichicastenango

 

"There is lots to see, smell and taste. Food vendors sell local dishes with pre-Hispanic origins"

 
Pulique, a prehispanic chicken dish with "recado" (a Guatemalan word for a complex sauce)

Pulique, a prehispanic chicken dish with "recado" (a Guatemalan word for a complex sauce)

 
©_eatnologist_guatemala_america_food_sketchbook_food_travelsketch9.jpg
Signs of catholicic and mayan syncretism

Signs of catholicic and mayan syncretism

Notes for the recipe

Notes for the recipe

 
The church of Santo Tomás in front of the Chichicastenango market, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh.

The church of Santo Tomás in front of the Chichicastenango market, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh.

 

Situated not too far away from Lake Atitlan, the village of Chichicastenango is still a mystical place where Guatemalans from all around the country come to trade and sell their goods every Thursday and Sunday in a big outdoor market that -in essence- has not changed very much in the last 500 years. There is lots to see, smell and taste. Food vendors sell local dishes with pre-Hispanic origins, such as Pulique, a chicken dish with recado (recado is the Guatemalan word for a complex sauce with a thick texture which is the result of adding corn flour at the end of the cooking process).It is served with -yes- corn tortillas. However, the unique flavour of this recado is provided by the Apazote plant. People believe that Apazote is great to help remove negative forces from the body. For positive forces you should drink Atol Blanco. Atol Blanco is a traditional corn-starch-based thick hot drink. So if you want to prove that you are a mero mero- a really true Guatemalan - and want hear them say "Assa Nigua!" - a Guatemalan expression of admiration- you have to drink lots of Atol. Don´t be surprised if at the end you really believe that you are made of corn.

 

So if you want to prove that you are a mero mero - a really true Guatemalan - and want hear them say "Assa Nigua!" - a Guatemalan expression of admiration- you have to drink lots of Atol. Don´t be surprised if at the end you really believe that you are made of corn.

But one of my favourite recipes from “Chichi” that I often prepare at home is totally corn free: a tasty radish salad with Chicharrones (fried pork rinds) called Cojin Chichicastengo* that I first tasted at a food stall in front of the church of Santo Tomás, the church where centuries ago the priest Francisco Ximénez kept his transcription of the Popol Vuh. 

(*) 
Without Chicharrones (fried pork rinds) the salad is known as Picado de Rabanos and it is a delicious side dish (very close to the mexican Pico de Gallo Salad) that goes well with any kind of grilled meat, adding Chicharrones turns into Cojin Chichicastengo.

 

© Text, Artwork and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist

 
 
2 p.m. Caye Caulker

That Recipe on my Mind

 

Quick note / no recipe: Squid ceviche with spicy mango jelly, avocado mousse and tortilla crumble. A (modified) recipe from Belize.

Conch meat is dense and chewy like squid (and taste similar, so as conch meat is pretty rare or inexistent in Vienna I went for squid. Cutting the conch into very small cubes is the most important step to prepare a Conch Ceviche, a dish that is common in Belize (also in Bahamas). After covering the conch cubes (in that case squid) with lime juice, let it marinate for a couple of hours (if possible in the fridge), add onion, tomato some chili (or tabasco), salt and chopped cilantro if you like.

Many other variations are possible and just as delicious (for example adding small cubes of pineapple or avocado). For that occasion I added mango jelly with chili flakes, some avocado mousse and tortilla crumble.