Notes from Ambergris Caye

Exploring | Caye Caulker & San Pedro, Belize

- Fieldnotes - 

 
 
  It takes a 2.5 hour boat ride from Livingston (Guatemala) to the Sapodilla Cayes. The Sapodilla Cayes are the southernmost group of atolls in Belize. They are mostly uninhabited (just a few people live there)

 It takes a 2.5 hour boat ride from Livingston (Guatemala) to the Sapodilla Cayes. The Sapodilla Cayes are the southernmost group of atolls in Belize. They are mostly uninhabited (just a few people live there)

 
 
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 Cassava (Manioc) - Coconut Cakes and some notes

Cassava (Manioc) - Coconut Cakes and some notes

 

Island hopping. Going slow is easy to achieve at Ambergris Caye, also known as San Pedro. The Island has been nicknamed ‘La Isla Bonita’ ever since the 1980’s release of Madonna’s hit song. At Ambergris Caye Seafood is a common delight, with feasts of lobster, conch, and a array of fish, squid, mussels, scallops or shark with some mexican and cajun twist. I don’t think it’s possible to get more chilled than here.

 

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 Conch Ceviche

Conch Ceviche

 

Cutting the conch into very small cubes is the most important step to prepare a Conch Ceviche, a dish that is common in Belize (also in Bahamas). After covering the conch cubes with lime juice and let it marinate for a couple of hours (if possible in the fridge), add chopped cilantro, onion, tomato some chili (or tabasco) and salt.

Many other variations are possible and just as delicious (for example adding small cubes of pineapple or avocado).

 
 
 
 Cementery with sea view

Cementery with sea view

 
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 Coconut Tree Sketch

Coconut Tree Sketch

 
 A cozy bar at "The Split", Caye Caulker.

A cozy bar at "The Split", Caye Caulker.

 
 
 Cassava / Manioc / Woman | Sketch

Cassava / Manioc / Woman | Sketch

 
 I spent in this house some days. It's very close to the beach.

I spent in this house some days. It's very close to the beach.

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© Text, Artwork and Photography by Fred Mel / Eatnologist